“The bird that escapes from the trap of its ego has no fear, wherever it may fly.”

The dagger of hurt pierces you.
You tell the dagger that you deserve it.
It came under the permission of God.
Emptiness.

People look down upon you.
They desire not to be in your presence.
You think, they have found the Divine attributes within others
Let them enjoy the presence of God,
Manifested through the goodness of others.
Emptiness.

You envy the good in others,
the warmth, the exuberance that attracts.
You turn the envy into admiration of God.
You marvel at the beauty God places in others.
Emptiness.

Your parents ridicule your incompetence.
You accept your flaws and take their ridicule,
As a way of God correcting your adab.
Emptiness.

You admire the physical beauty in others and think,
“How beautiful must God be?”
Emptiness!

You admire the knowledge of others and think,
“How wise must God be?”
Emptiness!

You revile in your state, lowly before God.
You admire the fullness and unmatched power of Him.
You forget your own state, as you contemplate His.
Emptiness!

If you desire wealth of soul, seek emptiness!
If you desire happiness, seek emptiness!
If you desire company, seek emptiness!
If you desire wisdom, seek emptiness!

Empty yourself of your selfhood!
Empty yourself of your ego.
That foul creature that seeks praise, fame, popularity.
Empty it!

Remove the ego from your soul.
Forget yourself and surrender non-existence to God’s existence!
Be the moth that catches fire in the candle flame,
Burn yourself so that you reach height within the Flame!

Free yourself of the filth of this world!
The burdens of desire, ego, and self-worth.
Empty yourself, and you will find freedom!
“Die before you die” so that you are alive!


Life after death.
Calm over strife.
Finally, peace in emptiness.
______________________________________________________________________________________________
“The bird that escapes from the trap of its ego has no fear, wherever it may fly.”
“The world is like a mirror displaying Love’s perfection. Oh friends! Who has ever seen a part greater than its whole?”

These are two lines amongst thousands of Rumi’s poetry that Professor Chittick translated in his book, “The Sufi Path of Love: The Spiritual Teachings of Rumi”. Chittick divides the content of his book into three sections (dimensions): theory, practice, and attainment to God. This is similar to Iman, Islam, and Ihsan, yet Rumi is specifically focusing on “theory, practice, and attainment to God” within the dimension of Ihsan. Thus, there is form and meaning (multiple dimensions) within Islamic esotericism itself.

The first quote above infers that the source of suffering arises from man’s own ego. Satan may tempt and whisper to us, but men commit sins and suffer from their own selves and state of mind. A person who is easily offended by the words of others places a lot of value on his/her own self-worth, when in actuality; we are worth nothing in comparison to God. Sensitivity is an attribute of the ego, and mankind will be happier if they accept the ridicule of others and humble themselves. The second quote downplays the world view of dualism and dichotomy. Everything, including opposites (mercy and wrath) is a manifestation of God’s oneness. The beauty in the world of multiplicity acts as a mirror of the Beauty of God. Thus Rumi warns us not to be deceived by beautiful parts, but by the Beautiful Whole that is the source of them.

I wrote the above more than 6 years ago, and posted it now. =)